Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Research Guides

Eastern Washington University Libraries

English

Resources for English literature/literary criticism. See separate guides for Technical Communication (Undergraduates), TESL, and Rhetoric/Technical Communication (Graduate)

Find Information About a Particular Journal

Find a Journal, Magazine, or Newspaper

EWU Library Catalog Title Search -- Search to see if we have a particular periodical (journal, magazine or newspaper) online, in print or microfilm. Type in the name of the journal, magazine or newspaper in the box where it says "journal of". (Just erase and type in your title.)

  • Online access = we have the title online. Just click Online access to see a list of databases with date ranges. Click on the name of the database to view the journal.
  • Available at = we have it physically (in print and/or microfilm). Note the location and the call number. Click Available at to view the years we have available.

E-Journals -- Alphabetical list of the journals, magazines and newspapers we have online in our databases. It will not show if we have it in print or microfilm in the library.

If we do not have the periodical you are looking for, you may request specific articles via Interlibrary Loan.

How Important is Journal X?

Issues to consider:

Who is publishing the journal and how long has it been around?

Most journals are published by university presses or scholarly organizations, though some are edited by the scholarly organizations but published by for-profit publishers. You can find out how long a journal has been published on the journals website or using Ulrich's, but the volume number is usually the equivalent of the number of years (unless it's published weekly).

Impact Factor

Scientific and most social science journals care about their "impact factor" or a percentage of their articles that are cited by others. So you may find an "impact factor" number advertised on the journals homepage. The bigger the number, the bigger the impact.